Benefits of stair walking on insulin, weight gain in women with PCOS

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January 19, 2022

1 min read


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A new study showed that 3 minutes of moderate-intensity stair walking can lower glucose and insulin concentrations and 10 minutes can improve insulin sensitivity. It was the top story in endocrinology last week.

The second top story was about a study that found women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) gained more weight each year than women without PCOS. Researchers also reported that lifestyle factors had a greater impact on weight gain in women with PCOS.


Man exercising

Source: Adobe Stock

Read these and more top stories in endocrinology below:

Stair walking for 10 minutes may lower glucose and insulin, improve insulin sensitivity

Moderate-intensity stair walking for as little as 3 minutes can lower glucose and insulin concentrations, and 10 minutes of stair walking can improve insulin sensitivity, according to study findings. Read more.

Women with PCOS gain more weight annually, affected more by lifestyle factors

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome gained more weight annually than those without PCOS, and some lifestyle factors had a greater impact on weight gain with PCOS, according to study data. Read more.

GLP1, SGLT2 combination therapy provides largest weight loss for women with PCOS

Combination therapy with a GLP-1 receptor agonist and an SGLT2 inhibitor may provide better weight-loss benefits than a single agent for women with polycystic ovary syndrome and obesity, according to study data. Read more.

Nonthyroidal illness syndrome associated with increased risk for severe COVID19

Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis is an indicator for disease severity among people hospitalized with COVID-19, according to study data published in BMC Endocrine Disorders. Read more.

Diabetes education lowers health care costs, improves health care utilization

Diabetes self-management education and support interventions might help reduce health care costs and improve utilization, but evidence varies across studies, according to findings from a systematic review. Read more.

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