The ins and outs of composting

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Are you looking for ways to improve your green impact on the earth? At-home composting could be your ticket.

A popular practice among Earth-lovers, composting is a way to keep organic waste out of landfills. Defined as an organic material that can be added to soil to help plants grow, compost is often made up of food scraps and yard waste.

These waste products together currently make up more than 30% of what is normally thrown away, according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency. Making compost keeps these materials out of landfills where they take up space and release methane, a potent greenhouse gas.


Morgan Composting, located at 4353 U.S. 10 in Sears, has been utilizing the nitrogen-focused practice for 25 years. 

The business is known best for making Dairy Doo, which is a high-quality, designer compost. The business also makes potting soils and fertilizers that are powered by Dairy Doo including their Seed Starter 101, FlowerDoo 201, VeggieDoo 301, Healthy Garden 7-6-5, and Safe Green Lawn. These products are organic, without harmful chemicals, and Michigan-made. 

Theo Medendorp, an agronomist at Morgan, said the business utilizes a unique composting process.

“There are a couple of different types of composting,” Medendorp said. “The compost that we do is called a thermophilic windrow process. Basically, we take in the manure, it gets mixed with a certain amount of carbon to bring it up to the proper carbon to nitrogen ratio, and then it’s adjusted to the proper moisture. Once the mix is correct, it’s laid out in long windrose. Those are then left to heat up to a minimum of 131 degrees, and then it has to stay in that temperature range of 131 to 150, for a minimum of 15 days with five turnings within that period.

“We let it continue composting until it starts to cool down and goes into what’s called the mesophilic period,” he added. “That is just a cooling period, and then once it reaches a low enough temperature, it would be stockpiled and allowed to gear over the winter for sale the following year.”

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